December 2011


Pre-read

(1)  First 90 days – prelude; This is about strategies for leaders in new roles/jobs.

(2) First 90 Days Insight-1: Trust your boss

(3) First 90 Days Insight-2: Be Sympathetic

I wrote about this in the first insight itself that you can’t really postpone decisions in first 30 days. In the next 30 days, the problem is different. You know stuff but you don’t know enough probably. You could fall into the trap of indecisiveness and/or less communication.

The thumb rule is – you will never know enough. Especially, so, if you continue in this state. From whatever you know you will have an opinion. State it openly and confidently if in a brainstorming session or act on it if in a decision making situation. The catch is, be open to be corrected. But demand enough information before being corrected.

How many of us believe that Decisiveness and Flexibility do not go together? I believe they are a strong combination.

I must share (without specificity for obvious confidentiality reasons) an experience recently about how people reacted to such decisive remark in a brainstorming session. Few reacted with disdain and dismissed it. The official discussion took a more objective and constructive approach and I felt it led to meaningful dismantling of few myths. During the lunch/coffee people had thought about it and gave some excellent counter-arguments which I agreed on.

Overall, the discussions certainly made me wiser. I believe vice versa is true too, but I can’t be the judge.  For me, I understood about some nuances of the business I was getting into and got closer to few people.

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Pre-read

(1)  First 90 days – prelude; This is about strategies for leaders in new roles/jobs.

(2) First 90 Days Insight-1: Trust your boss

One of the concepts I liked from the ‘First 90 Days’ book is the “STaRS” framework.  Every business situation can be categorized into one of these: Startup, Turnaround, Realignment, Sustaining Success. Each situation needs a unique approach because the priorities and challenges are different. For example, quick decisions are critical in turnaround versus realignment. In realignment and sustaining success scenarios measuring success is not easy as against startup or turnaround. What is considered ok performance could have been worse and what is seen as good could have been better! In turnaround the focus is on dropping dead-weight, in startup it is on building solid team and so on and so forth… While I am at it, ensuring key personnel in organization go through STaRS situations grooms them. In fact, its one of the four ways selected people can be groomed:

1. Give cross-functional exposure

2. Expose to different geography

3. Prepare for career crossroads

4. Increase breadth of exposure to STaRS business situations

Hmm… makes a lot of sense! Anyone who has gone through all of this will be a lot wiser!

By the way, the insight I wanted to register was related to STaRS – Keeping my promise that you don’t have to read the book, I wrote a bit about it.

Unless you are in a turnaround situation, you are likely to encounter pockets of excellence in your new organization or group especially in a realignment or sustaining success situations. Consciously look out for these islands! General tendency is to be skeptical  or create a completely fresh setup. More often than not, if you are sympathetic to what is being said – you will realize there are interesting stuff that exists which can be leveraged or built upon. Some of this holds good for a new bride or groom – you enter a new system which needs to be respected. Understand first. Later, tweaking can be done for peaceful co-existence.

So, be sympathetic – this will help you spot more of those pockets of excellence!